leseanthomas:

Well, I think we also have to talk about the narrative, and making sure we’re starting at the beginning. You will find that the people doing the oppressing often want to start the narrative at a convenient point. They always want to start the story in the middle. Let’s start with a kid getting shot & killed…and left in the street for 4 hours. I’ve never seen a white body left in the street for 4 hours in the sweltering heat…the cop doesn’t call in the shooting…the body isn’t put in an ambulance, it’s shuttered away in some shady, unmarked SUV. There’s a lot of bizarre behavior going on, and THAT is the story. That is where we need journalism. That is where we need that element of our society to kick into gear, and not keep playing a loop of what a kid did apparently in a convenience store. We need journalism to kick in and start telling the story from the begiining, this is about finding justice for a kid that was shot, an 18 year old that was shot, period. And this idea that he stole a handful of cheap cigars, what’s that, $5 bucks from a convenience store? I’ve lived in white suburbs of this country for a long time. I’ve known plenty of white kids who steal stuff from a convenience store. This idea that every time a black person does something, they automatically become a thug worthy of their own death…we don’t own drug crimes. We’re not the only ones that sell and do drugs all the time, we’re not the only ones that steal, we’re not the only ones that talk crazy to cops. You know there’s a complete double standard, a completely different experience that a certain element of this country has a privilege of, of being treated like human beings…and the rest of us are not treated like human beings…Period. And that needs to be discussed. That is the story” - Jesse Williams 


caramelblackness:

transposedsouls:

Missouri Highway Patrol Captain Ron Johnson is marching with protestors in Fergoson, MO.

After being given control of Ferguson from the Missouri Governor, Johnson has ordered all police to remove their masks and cease their violent tactics. He is protecting the citizens’ right to peaceful protest, and is actively engaging in dialogue with protesting residents.


!!!!!!!!!!

(via chrisvisions)

eastwoodwong:

Utena in Balmain Fall 2012 because it’s not enough just having pink hair.

Going through old doodles that I’ve posted elsewhere… Orcs Going through old doodles that I’ve posted elsewhere… Orcs Going through old doodles that I’ve posted elsewhere… Orcs Going through old doodles that I’ve posted elsewhere… Orcs

Going through old doodles that I’ve posted elsewhere… 

Orcs

Small part of a bigger thing.

rebeccasugar:

Punch line Queen, no boxer though

Strong

(via ktshy)

itscarororo:

Hey guys, just a signal boost for a pretty cool crowdfunding campaign..

The program Animation Paper’s indiegogo is live!  Animation Paper is an animation program that is streamlined and easy to use, and is meant to imitate animating on real paper using a lightboard.  You got dope sheets and onionskinning and none of the useless extra features.  The layout is intended to be clean and uncluttered.  I’ve been waiting for this campaign to launch for a while, I’m pretty excited!

So, fellow and aspiring animators, throw some dollars at this sweet program, and reblog if you can, so that we can get this cool project to reach its goal!

(via anatomicalart)

comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1986: Marvel Graphic Novel #24 (Daredevil: Love and War)
From the same interview with manwithoutfear.com:

When I began drawing the first issue, I was working twice up, not one and a half times up, size-wise. I wanted to treat the Kingpin as this huge monolith, immoveable object - and regular comic size pages seemed too small. Frank, Ralph Macchio and myself were trying to keep the whole job under wraps, because we were all pretty aware that it was pretty radical although Frank and I agreed that the approach simply felt right. My treatment of the Kingpin became a rather well known secret around the office - everyone who heard about them wanted to see the pages - it seems like everyone knew about them but [former editor-in-chief] Jim Shooter. When Jim did find out about the job, he was adamant. No way was this going to see print in the regular comic. It was too radical and it veered too far afield of the established continuity. Jim called me in his office and said that he wanted to give us a chance to do the job - his solution was to turn it into a graphic novel. I was a bit disappointed in this option. I wanted to do it as a regular issue - or two - to me THAT was the arena for change. Graphic novels were outside the world of the actual comics and Frank and I wanted to see how far we could push things in REGULAR comics.
…
I hope we showed that an immoveable object could be reduced to rubble emotionally, internally by that from which his size affords no protection. Pretty classic resonance in terms of his jealousy and rage - all things readers can identify with in terms of universal emotional buttons. It’s what’s lacking in a lot of books and Hollywood fare. Character-driven action-people that you may not like, but who impact you. Not simply the latest “asteroid” movie with cardboard cutouts as characters. When I think of “cartoon characters,” oddly, I think of characters you can identify with (I still care about the Coyote in the Road Runner cartoons, I couldn’t care less about Bruce Willis in Armageddon).

comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1986: Marvel Graphic Novel #24 (Daredevil: Love and War)
From the same interview with manwithoutfear.com:

When I began drawing the first issue, I was working twice up, not one and a half times up, size-wise. I wanted to treat the Kingpin as this huge monolith, immoveable object - and regular comic size pages seemed too small. Frank, Ralph Macchio and myself were trying to keep the whole job under wraps, because we were all pretty aware that it was pretty radical although Frank and I agreed that the approach simply felt right. My treatment of the Kingpin became a rather well known secret around the office - everyone who heard about them wanted to see the pages - it seems like everyone knew about them but [former editor-in-chief] Jim Shooter. When Jim did find out about the job, he was adamant. No way was this going to see print in the regular comic. It was too radical and it veered too far afield of the established continuity. Jim called me in his office and said that he wanted to give us a chance to do the job - his solution was to turn it into a graphic novel. I was a bit disappointed in this option. I wanted to do it as a regular issue - or two - to me THAT was the arena for change. Graphic novels were outside the world of the actual comics and Frank and I wanted to see how far we could push things in REGULAR comics.
…
I hope we showed that an immoveable object could be reduced to rubble emotionally, internally by that from which his size affords no protection. Pretty classic resonance in terms of his jealousy and rage - all things readers can identify with in terms of universal emotional buttons. It’s what’s lacking in a lot of books and Hollywood fare. Character-driven action-people that you may not like, but who impact you. Not simply the latest “asteroid” movie with cardboard cutouts as characters. When I think of “cartoon characters,” oddly, I think of characters you can identify with (I still care about the Coyote in the Road Runner cartoons, I couldn’t care less about Bruce Willis in Armageddon).

comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1986: Marvel Graphic Novel #24 (Daredevil: Love and War)
From the same interview with manwithoutfear.com:

When I began drawing the first issue, I was working twice up, not one and a half times up, size-wise. I wanted to treat the Kingpin as this huge monolith, immoveable object - and regular comic size pages seemed too small. Frank, Ralph Macchio and myself were trying to keep the whole job under wraps, because we were all pretty aware that it was pretty radical although Frank and I agreed that the approach simply felt right. My treatment of the Kingpin became a rather well known secret around the office - everyone who heard about them wanted to see the pages - it seems like everyone knew about them but [former editor-in-chief] Jim Shooter. When Jim did find out about the job, he was adamant. No way was this going to see print in the regular comic. It was too radical and it veered too far afield of the established continuity. Jim called me in his office and said that he wanted to give us a chance to do the job - his solution was to turn it into a graphic novel. I was a bit disappointed in this option. I wanted to do it as a regular issue - or two - to me THAT was the arena for change. Graphic novels were outside the world of the actual comics and Frank and I wanted to see how far we could push things in REGULAR comics.
…
I hope we showed that an immoveable object could be reduced to rubble emotionally, internally by that from which his size affords no protection. Pretty classic resonance in terms of his jealousy and rage - all things readers can identify with in terms of universal emotional buttons. It’s what’s lacking in a lot of books and Hollywood fare. Character-driven action-people that you may not like, but who impact you. Not simply the latest “asteroid” movie with cardboard cutouts as characters. When I think of “cartoon characters,” oddly, I think of characters you can identify with (I still care about the Coyote in the Road Runner cartoons, I couldn’t care less about Bruce Willis in Armageddon).

comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1986: Marvel Graphic Novel #24 (Daredevil: Love and War)
From the same interview with manwithoutfear.com:

When I began drawing the first issue, I was working twice up, not one and a half times up, size-wise. I wanted to treat the Kingpin as this huge monolith, immoveable object - and regular comic size pages seemed too small. Frank, Ralph Macchio and myself were trying to keep the whole job under wraps, because we were all pretty aware that it was pretty radical although Frank and I agreed that the approach simply felt right. My treatment of the Kingpin became a rather well known secret around the office - everyone who heard about them wanted to see the pages - it seems like everyone knew about them but [former editor-in-chief] Jim Shooter. When Jim did find out about the job, he was adamant. No way was this going to see print in the regular comic. It was too radical and it veered too far afield of the established continuity. Jim called me in his office and said that he wanted to give us a chance to do the job - his solution was to turn it into a graphic novel. I was a bit disappointed in this option. I wanted to do it as a regular issue - or two - to me THAT was the arena for change. Graphic novels were outside the world of the actual comics and Frank and I wanted to see how far we could push things in REGULAR comics.
…
I hope we showed that an immoveable object could be reduced to rubble emotionally, internally by that from which his size affords no protection. Pretty classic resonance in terms of his jealousy and rage - all things readers can identify with in terms of universal emotional buttons. It’s what’s lacking in a lot of books and Hollywood fare. Character-driven action-people that you may not like, but who impact you. Not simply the latest “asteroid” movie with cardboard cutouts as characters. When I think of “cartoon characters,” oddly, I think of characters you can identify with (I still care about the Coyote in the Road Runner cartoons, I couldn’t care less about Bruce Willis in Armageddon).

comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1986: Marvel Graphic Novel #24 (Daredevil: Love and War)
From the same interview with manwithoutfear.com:

When I began drawing the first issue, I was working twice up, not one and a half times up, size-wise. I wanted to treat the Kingpin as this huge monolith, immoveable object - and regular comic size pages seemed too small. Frank, Ralph Macchio and myself were trying to keep the whole job under wraps, because we were all pretty aware that it was pretty radical although Frank and I agreed that the approach simply felt right. My treatment of the Kingpin became a rather well known secret around the office - everyone who heard about them wanted to see the pages - it seems like everyone knew about them but [former editor-in-chief] Jim Shooter. When Jim did find out about the job, he was adamant. No way was this going to see print in the regular comic. It was too radical and it veered too far afield of the established continuity. Jim called me in his office and said that he wanted to give us a chance to do the job - his solution was to turn it into a graphic novel. I was a bit disappointed in this option. I wanted to do it as a regular issue - or two - to me THAT was the arena for change. Graphic novels were outside the world of the actual comics and Frank and I wanted to see how far we could push things in REGULAR comics.
…
I hope we showed that an immoveable object could be reduced to rubble emotionally, internally by that from which his size affords no protection. Pretty classic resonance in terms of his jealousy and rage - all things readers can identify with in terms of universal emotional buttons. It’s what’s lacking in a lot of books and Hollywood fare. Character-driven action-people that you may not like, but who impact you. Not simply the latest “asteroid” movie with cardboard cutouts as characters. When I think of “cartoon characters,” oddly, I think of characters you can identify with (I still care about the Coyote in the Road Runner cartoons, I couldn’t care less about Bruce Willis in Armageddon).

comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1986: Marvel Graphic Novel #24 (Daredevil: Love and War)
From the same interview with manwithoutfear.com:

When I began drawing the first issue, I was working twice up, not one and a half times up, size-wise. I wanted to treat the Kingpin as this huge monolith, immoveable object - and regular comic size pages seemed too small. Frank, Ralph Macchio and myself were trying to keep the whole job under wraps, because we were all pretty aware that it was pretty radical although Frank and I agreed that the approach simply felt right. My treatment of the Kingpin became a rather well known secret around the office - everyone who heard about them wanted to see the pages - it seems like everyone knew about them but [former editor-in-chief] Jim Shooter. When Jim did find out about the job, he was adamant. No way was this going to see print in the regular comic. It was too radical and it veered too far afield of the established continuity. Jim called me in his office and said that he wanted to give us a chance to do the job - his solution was to turn it into a graphic novel. I was a bit disappointed in this option. I wanted to do it as a regular issue - or two - to me THAT was the arena for change. Graphic novels were outside the world of the actual comics and Frank and I wanted to see how far we could push things in REGULAR comics.
…
I hope we showed that an immoveable object could be reduced to rubble emotionally, internally by that from which his size affords no protection. Pretty classic resonance in terms of his jealousy and rage - all things readers can identify with in terms of universal emotional buttons. It’s what’s lacking in a lot of books and Hollywood fare. Character-driven action-people that you may not like, but who impact you. Not simply the latest “asteroid” movie with cardboard cutouts as characters. When I think of “cartoon characters,” oddly, I think of characters you can identify with (I still care about the Coyote in the Road Runner cartoons, I couldn’t care less about Bruce Willis in Armageddon).

comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1986: Marvel Graphic Novel #24 (Daredevil: Love and War)

From the same interview with manwithoutfear.com:

When I began drawing the first issue, I was working twice up, not one and a half times up, size-wise. I wanted to treat the Kingpin as this huge monolith, immoveable object - and regular comic size pages seemed too small. Frank, Ralph Macchio and myself were trying to keep the whole job under wraps, because we were all pretty aware that it was pretty radical although Frank and I agreed that the approach simply felt right. My treatment of the Kingpin became a rather well known secret around the office - everyone who heard about them wanted to see the pages - it seems like everyone knew about them but [former editor-in-chief] Jim Shooter. When Jim did find out about the job, he was adamant. No way was this going to see print in the regular comic. It was too radical and it veered too far afield of the established continuity. Jim called me in his office and said that he wanted to give us a chance to do the job - his solution was to turn it into a graphic novel. I was a bit disappointed in this option. I wanted to do it as a regular issue - or two - to me THAT was the arena for change. Graphic novels were outside the world of the actual comics and Frank and I wanted to see how far we could push things in REGULAR comics.

I hope we showed that an immoveable object could be reduced to rubble emotionally, internally by that from which his size affords no protection. Pretty classic resonance in terms of his jealousy and rage - all things readers can identify with in terms of universal emotional buttons. It’s what’s lacking in a lot of books and Hollywood fare. Character-driven action-people that you may not like, but who impact you. Not simply the latest “asteroid” movie with cardboard cutouts as characters. When I think of “cartoon characters,” oddly, I think of characters you can identify with (I still care about the Coyote in the Road Runner cartoons, I couldn’t care less about Bruce Willis in Armageddon).